Well look what's going to be turning up soon...

Casual Nausea - Change Your Reality


...And so, the great Moosick did attend a gig at which Casual Nausea - one of the worst band names in existence - were playing, and asides from the main vocalist's mike being turned up to 11 like it was a fucking harsh noise show, it was hardcore as fuck, and that was good.

Foreign Objects - Galactic Prey



For those of you who don't know, Foreign Objects was the original CKY, though it was originally techy progressive metal/rock. The key song being Disengage The Simulator, which made it through to Volume 1. Despite CKY being associated with Jackass and all those other jackasses, if you give Volume 1 a listen it's an excellently paced, considered album with emotion and childish incest jokes blurring seamlessly together so as to not put you off the excellent riffing that they've always been known for and if you disagree you're WRONG.

anyway they're starting it up again as a side project, but with a warmer, more atmospheric sound.

C418 - Minecraft: Alpha


If you don't like Minecraft you probably have some sort of horrible problem or a social life or something of the sort. Anyway, it's a pretty soundtrack and say what you like about game soundtracks, but Minecraft actually makes the loops and snippets come in from time to time rather than play the same 10 second loop for 40 minutes and that alone is sign of an impressive amount of restraint from C418 or Notch or whomever sorted that jazz out. Not that this is jazz.


Husk - Hymns


Advertised as a blackened hardcore group, use of more diminished progressions is considerably less present than it is in the lead riffs that embellish the chuggy, slightly sludgy supporting chords. But this isn't that black metal. Blackened hardcore is Hexis; this might have influence but putting it in the ad feels like a cheap shot at getting people looking for that interested. A typically raw sound is present very reminiscent of Rotten Sound and other breakneck fast bands. Slick changes in sound very distinct changes, too are consistently observable - very distinct changes, too - and the bass has a fantastic rumbling, muddy tone that offsets the brighter guitars only helping the transitions as it means that there's no off-putting changes in tone or sound between sections thus allowing for the distinct guitar tones to separate and rejoin cleanly like bloody puzzle pieces. Vocals are buried in the mix rather than being obnoxiously put above everything else like most fucking -core bands; giving the vocals an even more instrumental quality and a more rhythmic role than one of delivering a subject or tale. Short and sweet songs that merge together like blood and piss in a blender. Keelhaul is a bit of a sore thumb though. More atmospheric but detracting from the original heavier, abrasive style it's just a bit uninspired and I've heard gang vocals over a moody hardcore bassline far too many times. A lighter song comes in which kind of helps ease in Keelhaul and for all intensive purposes it's excellent use of context and you can tell the tracklisting has been considered carefully. Then it's back to the fast dissonant open string leads and repetitive -core. Finishes off on a longer song. A faster one too. I noticed something on the first listen and I'm hearing it again now and it's that fucking tom punching through the entire mix. You've got what is the thickest, sludgy song on the album and the drummer's hitting a trebly 8th note on it for the entire track. It's somewhere between making me want to tap my foot to it and turn it off. Regardless of how my mood takes it, it totally distracts from what is some of the best guitar work on the album and that's not really a good thing in this case.

It's pretty good. As I say about most bands I get requests for reviews I'd like to see it go further and do what the hell they want to but they're letting loose a little and it works well enough. It followed into some weird-arse experimental rock on my playlist which immediately put it on a downer. I'd like to see what Husk do when they really start to experiment.